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Both sides need to work together for our kids concerning pool PDF Print E-mail

“The sign of an intelligent people is their ability to control emotions by the application of reason.” - Marya Mannes (1904 - 1990), American Author and Critic

It is obvious as I speak to those involved with seeking solutions on what to do with Grant’s aging pool that little has been done, or will be done, for the simple reason that emtions continue to strangle progress.
As in any small town, history follows residents around, with old feuds and disagreements scarring progress. This is what seems to be happening when it comes to certain parties involved in each camp—the city and the Perkins County Pool Project (PCPP) committee.
As each group is perceivably backed into their individual “corners”, defenses run wild, blinding each to the real reason we are having this conversation in the first place—our children.
It is obvious to the naked eye that something needs to be done with city’s pool, especially to the bath houses, which are nearly the same as they were when I swam at the pool some 30 years ago. It is also  obvious that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements for the pool are not adequate.
It is also a fact that the citizens of Grant want something to be done to update the pool. Besides the 200 plus surveys that the PCPP committee has collected indicating that updates are wanted and needed, there is also the city sales and use tax that was passed in the primary election by the citizens of Grant in 2012 earmarked for a pool project—not for the ball fields, not for the golf course, but for the pool. These are facts.
Looking from the other side, however, it is a fact that funding a $1 million or $2 million dollar pool is a huge expense, one that may not be realistic for Grant. Especially, when we are competing with so many other towns around us who have updated pools, and also struggling ourselves to staff the size of pool we already have, let alone a larger pool. These are facts
I ask both sides—can you come together with JUST the facts, leave your emotions at the door, and get down to the business of working on the right pool for our town and for our kids? It’s time we have people on both sides who are willing to do this.
Becky Uehling